Orleans Hawks Puckett Cabin, BRP

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The Puckett cabin at milepost 189.1 on the Blue Ridge Parkway is a tribute to the  midwife Orlean Hawks Puckett.  She had little education and married John Puckett at 16.

Puckett gave birth to and lost 24 children. Many were stillborn and the rest died in infancy.  Many believe she symbolizes the strength of the Appalachian woman.  Several theories exist today about why Orlean’s was unable to carry a pregnancy to term.

In 1889, when Orlean was in her 50s, a neighbor went into labor and no doctor could be found. This began her career as a midwife, and for the next 50 years, she traveled the Virginia countryside, never charging for her services.   She was known for her compassion and skill. In more than 1,000 deliveries, she never lost a mother or a baby. Orlean delivered her last baby at age 94, and died in 1939. This cabin was her last home.

Orlean moved from her home in 1939 because of the construction of the Blue Ridge Parkway. However, she died three short weeks afterward. A small cabin on her property was preserved by the National Park Service, and is known to be Puckett Cabin.

Continuing her legacy, the Orlean Hawks Puckett Institute, in Asheville, North Carolina, works to promote and strengthen child, parent, and family development.

 

Wreaths Across America – Arlington 2017

My mom 

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A Weekend Trip to Colonial Williamsburg Virginia

My youngest daughter, who mastered in history, (sorry I had to get that in) and I visited Colonial Williamsburg this weekend.   The last time we were in Williamsburg together she participated in the colonial American Girl doll, Felicity, tour and tea.    Colonial Williamsburg hasn’t changed; then again, how could it?  🙂

Since everyone counts steps… we walked 18,000 steps on Friday and 12,000 steps on Saturday throughout Colonial Williamsburg .. my dogs were barking!   But so worth the visit …

Friday we had a wonderful lunch at Josiah Chownings Tavern and at Kings Arm’s Tavern on Saturday.   At Kings Arm’s Tavern we enjoyed our peanut soup while being serenade with Christmas carols from these 2 entertaining guys:

At R. Charlton’s Coffeehouse and Stage we enjoyed a cup of velvety chocolate.

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We toured the Governor’s Palace, Courthouse, Capitol, Magazine, Bruton Parish Church, the Public Gaol and so much more in very random order.   Here is a snippet of the sights throughout Colonial Williamsburg.

Autumn 2017 on Skyline Drive

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Advice from a Great Blue Heron and the Nikon D850

Advice from  a Great Blue Heron:

– Wade into life.
– Keep a keen lookout.
– Don’t be afraid to get your feet wet.
– Be patient.
– Look below the surface.
– Enjoy a good read.
– Go fish!

The 31st “click” with Nikon D850 and so far I love it!   And oh — at Huntley Meadows in Northern Virginia

Huntley Meadows

My first, but, not my last visit to Huntley Meadows.   Huntley Meadows Park is over 1500 acres of land and 1/2 miles of wetland boardwalks located in Northern Virginia, just off of Route 1.   A great birding spot — with over 200 species identified in the park.   🙂

Sunrise From the Arlington House, Arlington National Cemetery

The Arlington House (also known as the Lee House) sits on the hillside over looking the Potomac River and Washington, DC.    The Arlington House looks over 250,000 military grave sites.  These photos were taken standing directly in front of the Arlington House over looking the eternal flame of John F. Kennedy’s grave site and the rest of Washington, DC.   Can you imagine this sunrise/view every day?

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Visit Fine Art America to purchase a print of “Sunrise from the Arlington House”…. 

Arlington National Cemetery Wreaths Across America

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For more information on Wreaths Across America

A Bridge With A View

The Governor Harry W. Nice Bridge is scary.   It’s about 2 miles long, has two narrow lanes and no shoulders.  Concrete barriers line the bridge to stop a vehicle from plummeting over the side.   And the bridge is steep.   The Bridge opened in 1940 and carries a lot of traffic across the Potomac River between southern Maryland and King George, Virginia.    About a week ago I got stuck at the top of the bridge for repair work.   And it was scary —  so I had to do something to entertain myself so panic wouldn’t set in.   That’s when I yanked out the ‘ole iPhone and started taking pictures of PEPCO’s Morgantown Generating Station on the Maryland side.   If nothing else, that damn bridge has a view of the Power Plant.

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View from the Harry W. Nice Bridge

Hello Autumn….

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